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Iguazu Falls

Argentina & Brazil

sunny 24 °C

We had an early flight from BA to Puerto Iguazu (Argentinian side), a bit of a struggle after the previous night at La Bomba Del Tiempo, but once there and breathing the thick forest air we were all excited about visiting the falls. It was a quick trip into town to check in to our hostel (Garden Stone - not bad) and then we caught the bus out to the entrance of the national park, about a 30 min bus ride. Once in the park on the Argentinean side there were 3 walks to do; the Devils Throat (which is actually a train ride plus a walk), the Upper loop and the Lower loop, each involved about a 1.5km walk.

We started with the Devils Throat, which is the biggest waterfall in the park. The boardwalk goes right to the edge of the falls, quite an impressive sight with loads of water going over and you get drenched with lots of mist/rain shooting back up.
The Devil´s Throat, from the Argentine side

The Devil´s Throat, from the Argentine side

After this we did the Upper and Lower loops to check out all the other falls, but these were actually not so impressive as there wasn't much water going over and some of the falls weren't even working, which we assumed it meant it was the dry/low season. We even tried to do the boat ride up into the falls but found out this wasn't working either as the water level was too low. Not saying it wasn't an impressive day, but it didn't quite live up to expectations. However we still managed to spend about 6 hours there before heading back to town.
The Devil´s Throat, as seen from the Lower Loop on the Argentine side

The Devil´s Throat, as seen from the Lower Loop on the Argentine side

This was our last night in Argentina so we headed out for one last Parilla (Argentinean BBQ), and it did not disappoint. Absolutely delicious steaks accompanied with a little too much red wine.

The next morning we caught the bus across the border to Foz Do Iguazu, the Brazilian town on the other side of the river. Foz was a much bigger city than Puerto Iguazu and immediately we were back struggling with the language, now Portuguese, rather than Spanish which we had been doing ok with. Again after completing the check in (Pousada Natureza Foz - pretty average) we caught a bus out to the Brazilian side of falls for a look. On arrival we discovered that the falls were pumping today as they'd opened up the damn further up stream so there was loads more water going over. Now we're talking!

The Brazilian side has the grand overviews were you can see all of the falls at once, very impressive now they were working. There's a walk for about 1km towards the Devils Throat which has the views of the various falls, before heading out on a boardwalk towards the main fall. This was absolutely beautiful, waterfalls all around (above, below, in the distance) and various rainbows appearing in the mist. There's a theory that everyone's happy in here as all the positive ions (?!) in the mist from the falls take away your negativity and leave your happy. We can't dispute it as we were giggling with excitement and happiness.
A view of some of the falls from the Brazilan side

A view of some of the falls from the Brazilan side


Brazilian side of the falls

Brazilian side of the falls


Kerryn on the boardwalk on the Brazil side

Kerryn on the boardwalk on the Brazil side


The boardwalk on the Brazil side.  Awesome experience standing out there.

The boardwalk on the Brazil side. Awesome experience standing out there.

The other thing worth mentioning from Iguazu was the wildlife. Beautiful butterfly's in myriad of colours kept my camera going off (not that the falls weren't already giving it a workout), and then there was the Quatis - these cheaky little cat/possum like things which try to steal your food. They were everywhere and had no issues with trying to steal your bag or venturing into bins looking for a feed. Pretty cute though.
One of the many Quatis in the park

One of the many Quatis in the park

Posted by gavandkerryn 17:00 Archived in Brazil

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